CLASS LIST

  1. But It’s All on the Internet - The Internet is a wonderful tool for researching our ancestors; but, it should not replace some of the tried-and-true methods for discovering our ancestors.
    [Inst. Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG]

  2. 5 Ways to Facebook Your Family History - Use Facebook to share heritage with young and old relatives! This lecture demonstrates successful ways I’ve used Facebook to connect more meaningfully with kin, ask genealogy research questions, share discoveries, honor deceased relatives and even plan a family reunion. The handout includes a helpful how-to mini-manual to help users learn to navigate Facebook more confidently and with better privacy controls.
    [Inst. Sunny Morton]

  3. Finding Your German Ancestor’s Place of Origin - Where did my Germans come from? Learn how to determine your ancestor’s place of origin using auswanderunegn and other helpful records.
    [Inst. Dana Palmer, CG]

  4. Rooting Out Your Native American History - Learn how to use records sets that are able to link your family to a Southeastern NA Tribe and give you wonderful clues to family relationships, dates of events and residences.
    [Inst. Amie Bowser Tennant]

  5. Military Research I - The presentation will include
    - Types of Records
    - Locations of Record Repositories
    - What we can expect to find
    - What is available to the general public
    - What is available only to "Next of Kin"
    - Interpretation of information

    [Inst. Jim Phillabaum]

  6. Hidden Gems in the FamilySearch Wiki - The FamilySearch Wiki contains tens of thousands of pages to assist you in researching your family’s history.
    [Inst. Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG]

  7. Comparing the Big 4: Ancestry, FamilySearch, Findmypast and MyHeritage - Ancestry.com, Findmypast.com, FamilySearch.org and MyHeritage.com all provide international audiences with tools and records for researching family trees online. But which one—or ones—should you use? Learn why you should be familiar with all four sites; subscription and free access options; and how they compare for overall historical, tree and DNA record content. See general geographic strengths and how to and specific geographic content on each, as well as the presenter’s favorite features and cautions/challenges for working with each. You’ll also get a suggestion for building your “master family tree” securely—and from more than one website.
    [Inst. Sunny Morton]

  8. Locating Newspapers Using Chronicling America - Learn how to find what newspapers exist, which issued are online and how to get copies of those not online using Chronicling America.
    [Inst. Dana Palmer, CG]

  9. “Deeds” You Hear About These Underutilized Records? - This lecture focuses on using deeds and other underutilized record sets for fleshing out genealogical information. Other types of records include: estate packets, guardianship records and minute books.
    [Inst. Amie Bowser Tennant]

  10. Cemetery Research - The presentation will include
    - Types of Cemeteries
    - How to locate Cemeteries
    - Internet searches
    - What we can learn from Gravestone Inscriptions

    [Inst. Jim Phillabaum]

  11. Vital Records Before State Registration - As we reach further back into our family tree, we find that most vital records, as we know them, just did not exist. What alternatives can be used as primary evidence in our ancestor’s lives
    [Inst. Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG]

  12. Which Way Did They Go?! - A humorous song introduces this panoramic look at U.S. migration history and how to track our on-the-move ancestors. You’ll see what kinds of records mention old and new residences, unique transportation timeline for U.S. history, where to learn about migration routes and how to correlate findings from several sources into a narrative about an ancestor’s life.
    [Inst. Sunny Morton]

  13. Creating & Publishing a Cherished Family Book - Do you ever wish grandma left stories and photos for you to enjoy? Learn how to create a cherished family book using Microsoft Word.
    [Inst. Dana Palmer, CG]

  14. Finding Answers in Naturalization Records - Immigration research can begin right here in your own back yard. In fact, many researchers may feel inclined to “jump the pond” too quickly and overlook some wonderful sources. This lecture will cover two case studies using naturalization records and passenger lists in the 1930s and in the 1830s to answer brick wall questions. Jump aboard as we discover your immigrant roots!
    [Inst. Amie Bowser Tennant]

  15. Introduction to Genealogy: Tips and Tools To Get You Started - An overview of genealogy charts, gathering information, types of records to use, documenting sources, online databases, using personal genealogy software.
    [Inst. Cheryl McClellan]

  16. Finding Military & Unit Histories - Get started finding military and unit histories.
    [Inst. Robert Young]

  17. Library Genealogy Databases - Discover what your local library has! See what you can find with just a simple library card from subscription databases such as Ancestry Library Edition, Fold3, and World Vital Records with the help of your local librarian.
    [Inst. Anne Wachs]

  18. Creating Your Personal Tree Using RootsMagic - The program will cover the methodology of creating a RootsMagic Tree from various records, including those imported from other genealogical programs such as Family Tree Maker and Legacy.  We will also cover importing records from FamilySearch.org, My Heritage, Find My Past and Ancestry (if that capability has been released by Jamboree time).  Media and Source files will also be covered.
    [Inst. Leland (Lee) Cole]

  19. Tips on Joining a Lineage Society - What is a Lineage Society? How do I join? How do I get started? Learn some good tips and ideas as you explore lineage groups.
    [Inst. Jean Muetzel]

  20. Kids Doing Genealogy? The Earlier, the Better! - Genealogy is not an “old people” hobby. We’ll review kid-friendly principles to tap a child’s “inner genealogist” through family stories, simple research skills, and more.
    [Inst. Cheryl McClellan]

  21. Using DNA in Family History: FUNDAMENTALS, FABLES, FRUSTRATION, AND FUN - Many have now had a DNA test because it seemed to be the new and important tool for genealogists. Some however have found it not to be as helpful as anticipated because the science seems so complex. We will discuss the fundamentals of DNA and its application in genealogy research, how to get a test, which test is best as well as some of the problems that may be encountered.
    [Inst. Stephen McDonald, MD., FACP, FACE ]

  22. Deciphering Old Penmanship - Confused by crazy abbreviations and backward-appearing letters in old American handwriting? An overview of the dominant scripts for each time period and a look at common contractions and abbreviations will help you crack the code!
    [Inst. Cheryl McClellan]

  23. Tech Savvy Scrapbooking & Journaling for Genealogists - Learn how to use apps for creating scrapbooks like Chatbooks and MySocialBooks.
    [Inst. Amie Bowser Tennant]

  24. Intro to Temple Work - LDS Members ONLY – Isn’t it exciting to be a forever family. Your ancestors want this privilege too. Learn how to get started in submitting your family names to the temple. This class will walk you through the process.
    [Inst. Jim Phillabaum]

  25. Become a Pro Using Family Tree on FamilySearch - FamilySearch’s Family Tree can be a powerful tool when used properly. Come learn the tricks to be successful and connect with your relatives!
    [Inst. Dana Palmer, CG]

  26. School Daze : Finding and Using School Records to Trace Our Ancestors - Locating school records can be an amazing way of putting our families into place, especially when there may be no vital records available in the area.
    [Inst. Peggy Clemens Lauritzen, AG]

  27. Freedman’s Bank Records - Come and discover how The Freedmen Bureau Project is helping African Americans reconnect with their Civil War era ancestors.
    [Inst. Matthew White]

  28. Temple Work Session - LDS Members ONLY- You will need to have a FamilySearch account set up prior to coming to this work session at the jamboree.
    [Inst. Jim Phillabaum]

  29. Youth Q & A Session - This time is scheduled for youth to eat lunch. While the youth eat, instruction will be presented with ideas on effective family history Eagle Scout projects, Girl Scout projects, YW projects and service that can be done. The format will be informal and allow question and answers from attendees. General jamboree adult attendees at the conference many attend if they have youth interested in these projects too.
    [Inst. Dana Palmer, CG]

  30. Lunch - There will be an area provided for you to eat but we will not be providing lunches this year. You must bring your own sack lunch or visit a local restaurant. Please! no lunches, beverages or snacks are to be consumed in the class rooms, only in the area provided.